The Proyecto Peru blog

Welcome!

The stories in this blog covers the experiences of our interns and volunteers being with us here in Cusco, Peru. They talk about their work, adventures, the tours they take and help you with tips & tricks for when you are planning to come.

We are Proyecto Peru and we can help you organize your stay here in Cusco. We will coordinate your internship or volunteering, your language course and your accommodation. You can take Spanish classes, live at a home stay guest family or at an apartment. You can volunteer on a project or do your internship through us. And we have some really nice and alternative and unique tours available as well

We are an organization with a long history of helping students find that right project. Proyecto Peru started in December 2005. From a little school with only 2 classes, we've grown rapidly into a language and project institute with more than 10 classes, not just teaching Spanish but English as well. We also have virtual classes and offer online classes in order to get prepared before you get here.

Our goal is to continue helping the projects we work with and to make your stay a worthwhile and rich experience.

We hope you enjoy our blog and get an idea about the life here in Cusco.

Saludos Coen and Dora.

 

 

 

Visit to a volunteering project of Proyecto Peru

Hi everyone!

Last week I got the opportunity to go with Anne, one of our volunteers, to her volunteering project. It was great to be there so I would like to share something about the visit!
After school program
I met with Anne at a plaza near the bus stop. Apparantly we had to go by bus for about 30 minutes, I did not know Cusco was that big!
While we drove the scenery became poorer and poorer, seeing this is also part of the Cusco experience.
It made me also become quite happy, because our destination was a volunteering project where underprivileged children get good care and positive attention.
I am happy Anne was there, because otherwise I didn’t had a clue of where to get off the bus.
We arrived at the project and immediately some kids stormed at us for hugs, this was a very warm welcome!
There were some more volunteers and the owner of the project who gave me a warm welcome as well.
Anne told me that the volunteers mostly help the kids with their homework. They play with the kids, they eat with them and teach the kids hygiene by brushing teeth and washing hands with the kids.

Today Anne had to take a couple of children to the dentist and I went with her. It was mostly waiting on the children to be finished with their treatment. We kind of enjoyed it, because outside it was raining and hailing like crazy so waiting inside wasn’t a problem.
I really liked the system of dentistry students performing the treatments on the children. Most of the children have really bad teeth and, because of that, they need good healthcare. The parents often can’t afford this, so the program with free treatments is really win-win for the children and for the dentistry students to become the best dentists.

The children were very brave and really liked my camera. This became even more clear when we went back to the project and all the children almost jumped on me because they wanted to be on the picture. When I went home I had around 200 pictures on my camera!
What Anne liked the most about the project was playing with the kids, which became clear when a boy jumped on her lap while she was actually saying that. She told me that for her, volunteering was a great way of traveling, because you learn Spanish very well, you immerse yourself in the local culture and, by that, you learn a lot about the local way of living and the culture of the people who actually live here.

Thank you Anne for showing me your project! I surely got enthusiastic!
Britt
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Hi Guys!

Hi guys!

My name is Britt and I’m from The Netherlands. 

On the 25th of February, I arrived in Cusco to be an intern at Proyecto Peru for 5 months, a long time!

First, let me introduce myself.
My name is Britt and I am 23 years old.
I am a student in Groningen, The Netherlands where I study International Business & Languages.
The International and the Languages part is why I am here in Cuzco.
And actually the business part too, because I am going to be a marketing intern at Proyecto Peru.
So I guess you will see me often!
I have always wanted to go to South America, I don’t know why but it attracts me.
Now I’m here in Peru and it is nothing like any other country I visited.
I am still adjusting to the altitude, the culture and the new tasks I will be doing here combined with Spanish lessons.
When you have any tips for good restaurants, shops, tours, other things to see or do or how to behave here in Peru, please let me know!
I really like good food and discovering nice places, and I am also a photographer so I need to know all the good photo spots!
I am looking forward to meeting you all, please feel free to have a chat with me or to ask me all you want to know.

Hasta pronto!

First impression of Cusco

Carnaval @ Cusco

Me with my new alpaca sweater

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Meet Andrew, Proyecto Peru’s English Director

This is Andrew!

13010747_10207261626711321_2607594915367974018_nI’m Andrew Pixton from Salt Lake City, Utah. I came to Cusco in January of 2016 for a school internship. It was my last semester with the University of Utah, partnering with an NGO (Eagle-Condor Humanitarian to teach English at homes for disadvantaged girls and assist with village projects. In May, I finished both of my bachelor’s degrees in Philosophy and International Relations with an emphasis in sustainable economic development.

What happened next?

On finishing the internship, I had changed from a plan to leave Cusco after a few months to wanting to live and work here. I loved it too much to leave so soon. I went on a few more backpacking trips before returning to Utah to visit family. One month later I came back to complete my TEFL certification which would allow me to teach English professionally instead of just as a volunteer, and thus allow me to live in Peru for as long as I want. I started working at Proyecto shortly after, still enjoying every minute of it.

13325633_10207545326963650_8255888010232691749_nThere are a number of things about Peru, and especially Cusco, that drew me to stay. The people are beautiful, especially their children. I fell in love with the kids I taught and still visit them when I can. I love their culture and the near constant celebrations and parades in the plazas. I love exploring Cusco and nearby areas. Peru has gorgeous jungles, deserts, beaches, and mountains. Cusco is surrounded by mountains I need only walk up to for a hike and sometimes I’ll find some ruins or a religious monument.

I love working at Proyecto because I my coworkers are solid and fun to work with. My students are dedicated and beautiful. Private classes allow me to cater the lessons to each students needs and we get to know each other really well, creating a good friendship. Proyecto has cultural events each week for their students and is a great place for different cultures all over the world to come together and bond. I also teach classes to our business clients at remote locations that’s a challenge I enjoy.

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What it’s like to hike the Salkantay Trek in Peru!

Learn about Salkantay Trek from our intern!

After my first full month in Cusco, Peru, it was time to explore one of the Seven Wonders of the World, Machu Picchu!

There are several ways to visit Machu Picchu. It´s possible to do it in one day. Take a train to Aguas Calientes village. From there you can go by bus or by foot all the way up (if you go by foot, prepare yourself for quite a lot of stairs!). You can also choose a trek for three or five days in which you will do and see many more beautiful sceneries and landscapes. My friends and I chose to do the Salkantay trek, which is a five day trek. We have seen so many beautiful sceneries and did so many amazing things, it felt as if we were away for two weeks! I´ll explain this amazing adventure with some general information below:

  • We were allowed to bring two backpacks: one to carry along the way and one for the horses, the latter was mainly filled with water and a sleeping bag.
  • Our group consisted of 20 people from Germany, Switzerland, America, Brazil, Israel, England, New Zealand and Romania. Our guide was Peruvian so we had a mixed group.
  • We slept in tents for 3 nights on a campsite and we slept in a hostel on our last night.
  • During the trek, we were accompanied by three chefs who prepared breakfast, lunch and dinner for us. I must admit, before joining this trek, I prepared myself for a lot of rice and chicken but the varying choices of other meals from potatoes, pasta, meatballs, various fruits and vegetables. For breakfast, we had pancakes or omelets. And before every dinner we had “happy hour,” which consisted of tea, coffee or hot chocolate with popcorn (= best combination ever!). We also had some vegetarians and people who couldn’t eat gluten food also had great alternatives.

It was almost a mission impossible to tell you everything about the Salkantay trek. Instead, here are some of the highlights.14720581_10210337430773678_6676677359631953150_n

Day 1:

The category of “wake up early”. At 4:45 AM, we had to be ready at Plaza de Armas to be picked up by the bus. The first day we walked a lot, including some steep sections. I rented hiking poles and I was quite happy with them. The absolute highlight of the first day was Lake Humantay, on top of a mountain! The hike towards this lake was quite steep, but it was amazing! The first night was also the coldest of the trek. I wore a tank top, a long sleeve shirt, sweater fleece vest, and a jacket.

Day 2:

On the second day, we also hiked a lot and we saw the snowy Salkantay Mountains, at an altitude of 6271 meters. We also encountered some difficult sections but it was so worth it! As we hiked further towards the jungle, everything around us changed. The scenery and landscape became greener and it also became more humid. All of a sudden, it started to rain and hail like crazy! By the time we arrived at our campsite, everyone was soaked. After dinner, everyone rushed into their beds. Or, well, tents in this case.

Day 3:

On day three, we hiked the whole morning but when we arrived at our campsite, we were welcomed by three little puppies! They were so cute and everyone played with them. In the afternoon, we had time to relax, chill in a hammock, play more with the puppies and we went to the hot springs! The hot springs were a great way to relax from all the hiking. And on top of that, we had the chance to shower for the first time in three days. Yes, you don´t feel really fresh and clean during a trek like this but who cares, right? At night, we all sat by the campfire and talked. We also stayed up a bit longer because we didn’t have to get up too early (at 7:00 instead of 5:00 like the other days).

Day 4:

On day four, it was time for some adrenaline, ziplining! We went twice in the “normal” sitting position but we also went upside down and as Super(wo)man. Afterwards, we had to cross a suspension bridge, really exciting and a bit terrifying. Not really suitable for people who are afraid of heights. After these adrenaline rushed through our veins, we continued our trek to Aguas Calientes. When we arrived after a few hours of hiking, we ate in a restaurant and slept in a hostel (the second opportunity to shower!).

Day 5:

The last day was, off course, Machu Picchu day! We got up at 5:00 and started the hike, or let´s say it like this, we started to climb all those stairs. When we started, it was freezing cold but after a while we got warmer off of climbing all those stairs. And then it started to rain! Around 6:00 in the morning, we made it to the top of Machu Picchu and the view was just spectacular!

That´s how I thought it would be, but it wasn’t…..14332946_10210573861204353_7943813700206649760_n

When we arrived at the top, it was really cloudy and the fog blanketed the Inca ruin. We couldn’t see anything! Our tour guide started explaining to us about the different mountains while looking at the fog and he could just have said anything he wanted because we couldn’t see it anyway. The tour lasted for two hours and was actually a bit disappointing because we were all wet and cold, so we couldn´t really enjoy it. After the tour, my friends and I looked at each other and we immediately knew what to do, drink coffee in one of the restaurants. We sat there for two hours and then we went back up again. And this time we had the great experience! The sun was shining, so we could really enjoy the view which was amazing of course! After walking around for a few hours and taking many, many pictures, we went down all of the stairs again, had a nice lunch in Aguas Calientes and waited for the train which took us back to Cusco. At 23:00 I got home tired, but satisfied. I was so happy with this (probably) once in a lifetime experience!

The trek, though sometimes cold or wet, was all so worth it!

If you have the chance to do the Salkantay trek, take it and enjoy it to the fullest14650483_1396780670349388_7659659611543058906_n!

 

 

 

 

 

By Anne van de Plasse of the Netherlands, Proyecto Peru Volunteer Coordinator Intern

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Adventures in Cuzco: My Life as an ESL Teacher

It's the beginning!

cusco-hanging-in-cuscoMy name is Veronica Lysaght. I am a proud Ohioan from Toledo! I recently completed my Master’s Degree in Latin American History in the United States. Now, I am an English teacher at Proyecto Peru Centre in Cuzco. I love Peruvian food, Inca history, and learning Spanish! Here are my experiences.

cusco-plaza-de-armasI moved to Cuzco three months ago. During the first month, I completed my TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language License) in September, 2016. If you want to teach English in Peru, most schools require a TEFL or ESL certification. The course took one month to complete. While difficult, it was also a lot of fun and it was necessary for me to teach English at Proyecto Peru Centre.

 

What's next?cusco-dance-at-the-central-plaza

After completing the TEFL course, I began looking for work in English schools around Cuzco. I especially wanted to work at Proyecto because I liked how, as an English teacher, I had the opportunity to work with students one-on-one. I plan each class according to the student’s unique level and personal interests associated with English. Proyecto allows me to work at each individual student’s pace. Although I have only been working here for one month, the work that I have done with my students has been incredibly meaningful. As I teach my students English, I have learnt so much about Peruvian culture and their own lives in the process! All of my students (I teach both adults and children) have been such a pleasure to work with. I am ecstatic that I have the opportunity to work here. 

Finally, as an English teacher at Proyecto, I have the opportunity to travel and explore Peru (especially on weekends). For anyone who wishes to come here with Proyecto, I highly recommend hiking Rainbow Mountain, touring the many museums and churches in Cuzco, and trying cuy (guinea pig) at a local restaurant!

Again, I cannot stress enough how much I love working at Proyecto and living in Cusco. The food, culture, scenery, and working environment that I have become accustomed to is both challenging and rewarding!

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Tips and tricks on how to prepare your trip to Peru

Tips and tricks on how to prepare your trip to Peru

Travelling to Peru?
If you follow the Tips and tricks in this blog, you will have a great time without any trouble or problems!

Just lean back and enjoy your trip to Peru!

Cusco in the morning

View at Cusco from Saqsayhuaman

VISA
Most European and North American visitors with a valid passport are permitted to stay in Peru for 183 days without any visa requirements. ALWAYS ASK CUSTOM AGENTS FOR 183 DAYS IF YOU PLAN TO STAY LONGER IN PERU. However, travelers from all African countries (except South Africa), Middle Eastern and Eastern European countries must pre arrange their tourist visas: You can visit this web site to know exactly for which country you need a visa to visit Peru:
http://www.consuladoperu.com/general/index.php?consulado=&pagina=EsxtranjerosPeru.php

If you leave Peru during your stay, you can reenter Peru without any problems, as long as your total stay doesn’t exceed the permitted 183 days per calendar year. A traveler must show his or her passport upon entry, which must be valid at least 6 months from the date of your arrival. An onward flight ticket is officially required to enter the country. Upon arrival in Peru, you will be given a tourist visa ticket which you should keep in a safe place. You will need to show this ticket when you exit the country.

Chinchero

Alpaca fibre processing

LIMA
All international flights arrive at the airport in Lima, the capital of Peru. There are plenty of available flights from Lima to Cusco. Be aware that your luggage will never go directly to Cusco. You always have to retrieve your luggage in Lima, go through customs and then check- in for your flight to Cusco. Some (inexperienced) airport personnel will tell you that your luggage will go straight to Cusco but that is not always possible.
If you want to stay in Lima for a few days, never trust the taxi drivers outside the airport. Always choose a reputable, secure taxi. Make sure you that make a reservation at a secure hostel before you arrive.

Rainbowmountain

Landscape at Ausangate

MONEY
The Peruvian currency is the “Nuevo Sol”. However, some big companies use U.S. dollars. Local shops and markets only accept Soles. We recommend exchanging money in banks or in “casas de cambio” because they offer more security and guarantees. NOTE: If you plan to exchange U.S. dollars, try to bring the newest and cleanest bills possible. Most places (even banks!) will NOT accept dollars that look old, dirty or torn. There are only a few companies that accept credit cards.

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Volunteer Work From Two Perspectives

I am used to being on the ground floor working with community development. In schools, institutes, and non-profits, I have dedicated a lot of my time in teaching and empowering children in low income communities to improve their opportunities. In my experiences, I have seen a lot of really great things get done. I do this type of work because it is incredibly gratifying to see the development of these children and communities. Community centers, vegetable gardens, and libraries have been built. I´ve had students improve their grades, become leaders, and pass tests to study in universities abroad.

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As the Volunteer and Internship Coordinator at Proyecto Perú I no longer get to experience these things first hand. I take volunteers to projects, see the kids for about 10 minutes, and then head back to my office. It was a difficult adjustment for me at first, not being on site, talking through project coordinators to see how the projects are advancing. I would drop volunteers off and try to stay as long as I could to soak in the environment before returning to my desk. I have learned to appreciate the work done in the projects from a distance. Instead of just working in one place, with 20-100 children, at Proyecto Perú I get to work with more than 30 different projects, that serve more than 1,000 children overall, give job training, measure and combat malnutrition for over 100 families, offer healthcare to people without health insurance, and provide a home and opportunity for adoption for over 70 dogs. In my 8 months here, we have had a project install a water collection system for a community without running water, we have raised funds for and installed computers in after school projects, created a sports field out of an abandoned yard, painted murals, and donated thousands of dollars of materials to improve the infrastructure and teaching environments of various projects. While it might be hard to see the progress in just a few short months for individual volunteers, I get the benefit of seeing the impact of all their work over time.

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The advice I always give to our volunteers, is to be proactive and open-minded. Your experience is what you make of it. There are many projects that do not have the organizational structure to give volunteers constant supervision; it is important that the volunteers see an opportunity to help, and react to it. When the volunteers do this, murals get painted, yards get fixed and made safe for children, learning materials get bought, fundraisers get created and carried out successfully, and the volunteers have a positive experience. If a volunteer waits to be told how to be helpful, they usually feel underutilized. Volunteers need to be open-minded because the cultural differences are drastic in some circumstances. Children do not resect authority like they might in other places. Projects might not have running water or electricity. Sanitary standards in medical projects would be completely unacceptable in the United States or Europe. Staff members at projects may be unhelpful or seem uninterested towards volunteers. If the volunteer can overcome these cultural shocks, the interchange with the beneficiaries of the project will be worthwhile.

Tyler Compere (Projects and Volunteer Coordinator)

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Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans. (John Lennon)

Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans. (John Lennon)

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Enjoying the little things in life

I am not a religious person and I wouldn´t say I´m superstitious either. But what happened a week ago did make me think about “something up there”. Or the Inca Gods just definitely having other plans for me than going back to my routine in Germany.
After five weeks of working as an intern in the marketing section of Proyecto Peru and being able to visit a few places in Peru, it was time for me to say goodbye to this wonderful country.

I wasn't gone that long, but nevertheless Peru changed my world, at least the way I look at it and definitely something inside me. I just felt this overwhelming feeling of gratitude and to be honest (although there are a few people I miss in Germany) it didn’t feel like it was already time to go. Somehow it felt like leaving a party that had just begun to get crazy and crowded and unforgettable.
To make the long story short: A lightning hit my plane in Cusco. Believe it or not!
Everybody with an international flight connection was put on another plane to Lima in order to catch our connection flight. But no chance. After a back and forth of “Iberia doesn’t wait for any passengers” and “Iberia has delay as well”, four other people and me weren’t allowed to go onto the plane as we weren’t able to do the online check in.

So that was it: Final destination wasn’t Frankfurt anymore, but Lima.

Lunch break on the Salkantay trek

Sharing is caring

I guess this was the moment when it hit me.
Thinking about all the “spiritual” and intensive talks I had with several people (that by the way, I will never forget!) on the Salkantay trek, I saw “the sign”. Guess what?
I didn’t book the next possible flight home, but decided to stay two weeks more!
After a one day luxury-stay at the five-star Sheraton in Lima with rooms, restaurants etc. I never imagined to see myself in, I strolled around Lima for a day and then arrived back to reality: 27 hours in the bus back to Cusco.
It should only take you about 19 to 20 hours, but if you drive at a speed of 20km/h (not kidding)… well... let’s just say: it takes you just a tiny bit longer.
But seeing the faces of my two really close friends I made here (thanks for making this time so unforgettable chicas!), made everything okay again!

So life goes on – even if you stumble sometimes.
And I am enjoying the working-hours at the office again, using the weekends to discover more beautiful places in Peru and as I used to say it in Germany “dance till the clouds are purple again”!

Pisco Sour Night with the "chicas"

Pisco Sour Night with the "chicas"


Cause…
Maybe the journey isn’t so much about becoming anything. Maybe it’s about unbecoming everything that isn’t really you, so you can be who you were meant to be in the first place.

By Josseline

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Time Flies When You’re Having Fun

NO EXACT AMOUNT OF MONTHS IS ENOUGH TO EXPLORE PERU

Exactly 2 months ago I arrived in Cusco for the very first time to start my internship and I can’t believe that it’s already over of having the chance to explore Cusco and its surroundings. The last weeks were jam-packed full of adventures, new experiences and incredible friends.

If anyone is reading this article, still thinking about whether to come to Cusco or not, I can only say: what are you waiting for?!

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Where do I start with this city? It’s bursting with life! The sight of Cusco from a bus window as you’re winding down from a mountain road is incomparable and I can assure you that you’ll feel at home faster than you can say “llama”. I was welcomed by my host family as well as by my colleagues at Proyecto Peru warm-heartedly and with open arms. I had my one room, they helped me with all my struggles I had the first days, showed me around, gave me advice and on top, my host mum Violeta was an incredible cook!

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Of course there’s a large presence of tourists in Cusco, but we’re obviously one of them and there is a benefit for us through this: there are countless opportunities for day trips, treks and other activities in and around Cusco, as well as a huge number of shops to buy alpaca sweaters, colorful bags, hats, handicraft jewelry and other Peruvian souvenirs for your family or friends (or yourself, let’s be real). And it’s a city with a rich history, which definitely deserves more than just a stopover before heading to Machu Picchu. The local food is delicious and you can buy a menu turistico including a soup, a main dish, a dessert and a juice for 15 soles on nearly every corner.

Even though it’s difficult to summarize my first month here, let me tell you about some of my most memorable days in Cusco so far:

  • Salkantay Trek: an alternative multiple-day trek to the Inca trail, where you hike over passes and into valleys until you reach the ruins of Machu Picchu. The landscape around you changes incredibly fast and in those 5 days you’re able to see snow-peaked mountains, glaciers, herds of alpacas as well as a deep-green jungle full with exotic fruits and parrots.

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  • Rainbow mountain: you probably already saw countless pictures online, and I can only confirm that pictures don’t do this place justice. And as long as you take your time, bring snacks and take enough breaks, I think everybody is able to hike those 5030m.

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  • Cloud forest: living in the middle of the cloud forest, surrounded by plantation of bananas, maracuyas etc, relaxing in hammocks, hiking up to waterfalls and learning more about the Incan culture was definitely worth it!

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Of course there is so much more to do and my bucket list even keeps getting longer the more time I spend here.

I met other volunteers and interns of Proyecto Peru during the weekly activities or the volunteer dinners (Pisco Sour Night, Salsa lessons, quiz nights etc.) and we are having a great time: having dinner together in the evenings, going out and enjoying Cusco’s night life (there are so many bars and clubs you should be checking out) or simply exploring Cusco, getting fresh juices at the local markets or hiking up the surrounding mountains to enjoy Cusco from above. I just wanted to say thanks here to my little familia cusqueña, I’m so happy I met you all!

During my internship I got to see a lot of different projects Proyecto Peru is working with: orphanages, after school projects, working in local hospital or dog shelters – if you want to volunteer, Cusco offers you so many different opportunities and they will be incredibly thankful for your help and assistance.

In my first weeks I took classes to improve my Spanish skills and my teacher Geraldine is the best! We talked so much, we visited different museums in Cusco together (Inka museum, choco museum etc.) and I really enjoyed every single lesson with her.

As you can see, you won’t be lonely or bored if you’re staying in Cusco. Step out of your comfort zone and visit Peru!

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By Carolin Schwager (Volunteer Coordinator Intern)

 

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A complete change of scenery

…and suddenly my experience in Peru is over…“El tiempo pasa volando”!

I definitely learned a lot within the last 4 months. Not only did I gain a lot of experience within the working life, I also met people from across the world, and visited around this amazing country.

First off, a little about myself. My name is Idriss, I’m from Paris, France, currently studying Master Management & International Business. I enjoy travelling, meeting new people, and learning about different cultures. As part of my degree, I had to do an internship abroad this year.
I knew immediately that I wanted a total change of scenery as soon as possible but also to improve my Spanish. So South America seemed to be the perfect place for me. Fortunately, my internship search didn’t take long as I found Proyecto Peru very quickly. And between the moment I applied and landed in Cusco, less than one month had already passed.

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I worked at Proyecto Peru as an Assistant Coordinator, more precisely as an Assistant Volunteer Coordinator. The Coordinator is the main contact between the volunteers, their projects and the host families. Basically, my job was to assist in organizing of volunteer projects and ensure its follow-up. For someone who likes to meet new people from all over the world, this is the perfect job, as every week there are new volunteers arriving!

I learned a lot during my stay. First, my Spanish definitely got better. I also learned a lot about business management and its functions.
As for my experience in Cusco and Peru in general, it was just great! I think Peru has something for everyone. It was rare for me to stay home during the weekends, considering all of the activities I could do!

If you like history and culture, well, Peru and, specifically, Cusco is known as a historical center, the fusion of pre-Inca, Inca and Spanish heritage, we can count thousands of its ruins, museums and historical churches.

If you like sport and adventure, Peru is known for its diverse landscape, mountains, beaches, jungle, and desert. It’s possible to do hiking, biking in the mountains, rafting, exploring nature and many other things.

If you like to eat, like I do, there will always be something new to try! And one thing I’ll miss the most about Peru and that I had to highly recommend is that you can eat street food for 4 soles (1euros!). You can get a soup, a main dish and a drink! 4 soles!!!
I am very thankful for the opportunity Proyecto Peru team has given me, and the things I learned during my internship and my stay in general.

Time to say goodbye, and hopefully see you soon Cusco!

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Nos vemos! Saludos,
Idriss (Past Volunteer Coordinator Intern).

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http://www.internship.edu.pe/blog/
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